Why is the Scarab so Sacred?

In the ancient Egyptian religion, the sun god Khepri was believed to move the sun across the sky every morning, and was also seen as a god of creation and rebirth.  He was believed to have been involved in the creation of the earth, and ancient Egyptians believed that he restored the sun each morning and then rolled it over the horizon giving them light. The god’s name is even derived from the ancient Egyptian word, “kheper” which means to develop or create. Coincidentally, Sarab beetles in  Egypt of the family Scarabaeidae, also known as dung beetles, regularly roll dung into a ball to serve as asort of nest in which to lay their eggs. This  act of rolling an orb across the landscape was seen to have a divine similarity to Khepri’s rising sun. The hatching larvae then eat the decaying organic matter of their ball nest to grow strong, as well as serve a vital role in our environment by decomposing dead material. Therefore, showing further similarity to the creator god Khepri, who created life seemingly out of nowhere.  Because of these similarities the scarab was associated with this god, and soon became a symbol of status, achievement, and beauty in ancient Egyptian culture. Even today the scarab beetle in jewelry projects status and a regal air. So what better way to celebrate the goddess in your life than with a sparkling scarab. To get these unique handmade scarab designs just follow this link: Insect Diva Shop.

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Photographer: Dr. Diana

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Photographer: Dr.Diana
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Photographer: Dr. Diana

 

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Model: Jenny Rieu, Photographer: Jason Kamimura 

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